Catching Up with the
Fastest Man Alive (Part 7)

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7


It's David Lynch does Charlie's Angels. ...

Itís Lovecraftian and everything, but itís also bright
and breezy with a different song in it every week. 

I think Iíve gone through most of the questions Iíd planned to ask you. Let me ask you one other question, though.

Mm-hm.

You sound like you have a lot of plans for the coming year. Iím sure there are things cooking over there in your brain in Glasgow this morning that I havenít even thought to ask about.

[Laughs.]

Anything exciting for the next year?

Iím trying to think what I havenít mentioned here.

I think Iím going to do some Batman projects because Iíve been speaking to the Batman guys, and Iím doing one soon. Iím going to actually start it in a couple of weeks. They said to me, "You know Batman Chronicles?" They said, "You want to do a whole issue of that next year as a big special?"

Have you had a chance to read any of the stories that have appeared there?

Yeah, Iíve really enjoyed Batman Chronicles; I think theyíre great.

Oh, itís the finest [Batman] book in a while. Iíll really be looking forward to your story there.

Thereís two I want to do, and thereís one they said I could have the whole comic [for]; I could have the 38 pages and do it as a [special].

Thereís a guy called Chris Weston, who drew one of the Swamp Thing stories—he drew the Nazi one. He and I were going to do a Batman story, and itís all from Alfredís point of view. Itís basically this insight into the death of Jason Todd, when Alfred had decided after Jason Todd dying that enough was enough and he wasnít going to hang out with this crazy rich guy anymore. And this is all getting out of control, so itís like—itís this big, expansive Alfred story that takes in Batmanís entire career. And thereís a lot aspects; itís a very big, complex thing, and thatís why we said, "Do a whole issue like this; get Chris to draw it."

Weíve talked to him about doing a couple of others, like a Batman special project as well.

But besides that, I think with my first love in life being Superman, Iíd really, really love to write Superman. And my Red Son editor said to me, "Would you like to sort of have fun and do an issue of Superman Adventures?" And I did an issue of that thatís out in November or December, I think.

Iíll be looking for that too.

Iím so happy with it. Actually, it worked out great, Ďcause—what, all my life?— Iíve been waiting to write Superman in his red-and-blue suit. You know, the real Superman, with Clark Kent and everything.

And actually writing that was brilliant. I had such a great time doing it, and I think theyíve got—

I know Scott McCloud, heís leaving it—

Oh, I didnít know that.

—and I think theyíve got someone else lined up, but if it falls through with the other person I really, really want to write that book, you know?

I donít want to write more than two books a month, but ideally Iíd like to be writing Elseworlds as a monthly book and Superman Adventures. And doing Saviour and stuff like that and all the other special projects—just doing that between.

But yeah, Superman Adventures—actually writing something that children can read and enjoy as well as adults is such a lot of fun to do. Iíd really like to try that again. Especially when youíre writing real-sex stuff, like Vertigo stuff.

[Laughs.] Exactly.

I think it can definitely balance out your karma if you write something like Superman Adventures.

Keeps your life on an even keel?

[Laughs.] Yeah! Well, Grant and I are doing a lot of telly and things like that, as well.

Hm. Really?

Yeah. Actually, right now weíre doing a sitcom for the BBC, you know?

That should be interesting. Any idea what itís going to be called?

Oh, yeah. Actually, weíve just gotten the first episodes out. Itís called Jacob's Crackers

[Laughs.]

—and itís a Charlie's Angels thing. Itís David Lynch does Charlie's Angels, you know? Thatís a comedy. [Laughs.]

[Laughs.] Must be very interesting.

Itís Lovecraftian and everything, but itís also bright and breezy with a different song in it every week. Itís bizarre that everyone seems really psyched about it—which is good, you know—but we really just thought nobody is going to laugh at this shit Ďcause the things that make us laugh donít make anyone else in the world laugh. But they do, so itíll be interesting to see what happens to that show.

Well, "a different song every week" certainly sounds interesting!

[Laughs.] Grantís doing The Invisibles for the BBC, as well, and Iím talking about doing a drama about the Royal Family.

I donít know if you know this, but thereís a company called Date Management in Hollywood where theyíve signed up a few comic guys. Theyíve got Garth Ennis, and theyíre talking to Mark Waid, and Grant and I are thinking about working with them as well. [W]e met with them recently in Los Angeles, so—

Yeah, I had heard that Grant had written a script for Lawnmower Man 3.

Oh, that was a separate thing altogether, that was.

Our first love is comics, though. We really do enjoy comics, but these other things pay better than comics. You know, you do something else when you canít write Superman or the Flash, but [youíre] always drawn back into comics.

Well, Mark, thanks so much for making time to talk with us this morning.

Not a problem.

Hope you have a fine afternoon. Weíre getting ready to open the store and start selling some copies of Flash.

[Laughs.] Good stuff. I hope you sell tons of it.

Me too!


Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7